Here is a bit of wisdom from Too Much Wool’s knitting blog (http://cassiana.typepad.com/too_much_wool/)

“I wish that everyone would realize that until recently beauty in things was commonplace and that it is our responsibility to demand that of the future. ” Sôetsu Yanagi

I realize that my blog is in a variety of colors and fonts this morning, but that is because I had another of those headache-causing conversations with my #2 daughter. She was asking me to find some music for her.

Bouthdi:  by Handel
Bouthdi: 
the tune will be Ombra mai fu
Bouthdi: 
it should begin on a B flat
CHOMPHOSY: 
ok, for handel we have sheet music for
Bouthdi: 
and hold it for a really long time
Bouthdi: 
maybe not this one
CHOMPHOSY:  “C
ome to the waters”
Bouthdi: 
I really would like you to check
Bouthdi: 
I don’t know that one
CHOMPHOSY: 
awake thou that sleepest”
CHOMPHOSY: 
i am checking!
CHOMPHOSY: 
sheet music, right?
Bouthdi: 
It has a different name than the one I am singing
Bouthdi: 
yes
Bouthdi: 
but my setting
Bouthdi: 
is from an opera
CHOMPHOSY: 
nothing says “ombre mai fu”
Bouthdi: 
and not religious
Bouthdi: 
It won’t call it that
Bouthdi: 
it will have an English name
CHOMPHOSY: 
ok. so I am looking for something by Handel that begins on a b flat?
Bouthdi: 
yes
Bouthdi: 
and holds it forever

I ask you: was this enough information?  A piece by Handel with an English name, beginning on a B flat (the “going on forever” part could not be taken literally enough to be useful)? See me sitting surrounded by sheet music, searching for this one particular piece. Actually, we eventually determined (with help from google) that it is the so-called “Handel’s Largo.” But even knowing the tune, I still have not found the arrangement with an English text. If any of you knows it, please help me out. Otherwise I will have to write some new words to it — actually, if any of you can help with that, it would also be appreciated. #2 daughter wants to sing this in church a week from Sunday, but we have determined that the original words — a love song to a plane tree focussing on the beauty of its fronds and the fact that there is no other vegetable so agreeable — would not be suitable. We think there is an English text, sometimes sung at weddings. If you can supply this text, I will come and sing it at your wedding.

I seem to have regained control over my fonts. Frankly, I have no more control over what my blog looks like than I have over what my hair looks like. Many of you may control both those things competently, but — although I am diligently reading this book on beauty and can now tell you quite a bit about the grooming habits of the ancient Egyptians — must still just take what I get in both areas.

My Buck piece is going to be very nice, I think. My director is so patient and kind about my counting, or lack thereof. #2 daughter will, I am sure, help me with those dotted sixteenths when she comes to visit, and thus save me from humiliation, while also redeeming herself for the incomprehensible IM demands.

 And the Methodist choir was very lively indeed. They laugh and talk and complain throughout the entire rehearsal. Neither of my daughters would enjoy this, but I am being open-minded. It is all very good-natured. I thought at first that they were sight-reading through some new pieces, and if so then they are very good sight-readers, but by the end of the rehearsal I was no longer sure. In fact, I don’t know what we were doing, but I plan to be swept up in the experience and not think about it much.